The Book of Taste is a blog & online store curated by Darrin banks. Based in Los Angeles, he offers design services & his posts explore art, entertainment, food, fitness, and fashion.

The Internet

The Internet

Syd Tha Kyd
Being an openly gay artist who unapologetically sings about her relationships with women, Syd Tha Kyd insists on her sexuality being a footnote to the music

I discovered The Internet earlier this year while visiting New Zealand. I was at a BBQ where great music had been playing all day long, when all of a sudden this sultry, sexy slow-jam came on. I stopped in the middle of my conversation and demanded to know what I was listening to—frantically trying to open up the Shazam App before the song ended. “Oh this is ‘Girl’ by The Internet—they’re American,” my host exclaimed. I couldn’t wait to get back to my friend’s apartment and listen to more of their songs. By the third track I had purchased the whole album (Ego Death) and was a devoted fan. I haven’t stopped listening to the album since.

The Internet

The Internet is a neo-soul sect of the hip-hop collective Odd Future co-founded by Sydney Bennett (Syd Tha Kyd) and Matt Martians. Hailing from Crenshaw, at the age of 14, Syd built her own music studio in her parents’ house where she honed her talent for sound engineering and mixing. With this love of musical physics she became a lead producer for Odd Future (founded by Tyler, The Creator featuring rappers and singers such as Mike G., Earl Sweatshirt, and Frank Ocean). The name started as a joke and then quickly became a veiled social commentary on the millennial generations’ codependent relationship with technology.  

Building a career as a prolific DJ and producer, Syd Tha Kyd hadn’t really considered singing her own songs. But with a voice so naturally soothing she could lull a colicky baby into a silent trance, I can’t imagine why there was ever a question. Her voice is smooth and airy like Janet Jackson (but without the nasal) and subtly sexy like Aaliyah. As I continue to listen, she sounds so much like Aaliyah (although Aaliyah's voice was a little heavier) part of me half expects—maybe half wishes—that a re-imagined cover of “Rock the Boat” or “More Than A Woman,” will come on next. There’s also a smokiness in her vocals that underlines her highly relatable lyrics about sex, love and relationships. Juxtapose her soulful and angelic vocal quality with beats so intricate and three-dimensional they can only be emphasized with a capital P.H.A.T. and you have Ego Death.

Ego Death Album

Released June 26th 2015, Ego Death is a “kick-it” kind of album you can put on Sunday afternoon and just chill—perfect for a sunny drive up the PCH with the top down (if you got it like that). Yes the music is chill, but it’s also the kind of album you could put on before going out to the club—dancing in your underwear, fixing your hair and feeling the beat with your pre-game cocktail.  Reminiscent of the 90s hip hop albums made by Tribe Called Quest or Diggable Planets, Ego Death is referentially “old school” but still manages to be progressive in its sound.  A touch of jazz here and there mixed with African drums, and some clever but restrained usage of technical effects and it’s no surprise Ego Death was nominated for Best Urban Contemporary album at last year’s Grammys.

I can’t help but drum along on the side of my steering wheel to “Go With It,” or “Gabby” (featuring Janelle Monae). It’s impossible for me not to get that deep shoulder action involved when I hear the jazziness of “For the World,” or “Under Control,” when the chorus assures me with “I need you to know, It’s under control, I got it, And as it unfolds, I got you, I promise, I promise I’m on it.”  And when Syd Tha Kyd sings, “Yeah I’m just sayin’ girl, I’m not tryin’ to hurt your feelings, But I gotta say it girl…You fucked up, Now I don’t even want you, Can’t believe I wrote another song about you,” I can’t help but smile thinking about the ex’s in my life who’ve done me wrong.

Syd Tha Kyd

Being an openly gay artist who unapologetically sings about her relationships with women, Syd Tha Kyd insists on her sexuality being a footnote to the music—freeing herself of any qualitative distinctions society would gladly label her with. It seems that other controversial issues like police brutality and the disenfranchisement of the African American community are more important to The Internet. Songs like “Penthouse Cloud” say it all with an evocative melody.

Penthouse Cloud

Did you see the news last night?
They shot another one down
Does it even matter why?
Or is it all for nothing?

Father, who art in heaven, is this how you saw it?
When you made your creation, is this what you wanted?
Is this what you wanted?

 Maybe we'll never know
Or maybe we'll find paradise in the sky
When we die
When we die
When we die

Took her to the moon last night
Little bit of, weed a little, wine
Left everything else but high
No plans on coming home

Father, who art in heaven
This is what you've started, it's your creation
Is this what you wanted?
Is this what you wanted?
 

Rather watch the world burn down from a penthouse cloud, real talk
But if this is what you want I'll fight 'til the smoke-filled skies make the days turn night, then what?
Maybe when the world burns down and the clouds turns black and the sky turns white and the days turn night
It's a war outside, it's a war outside, it's a war outside
Or maybe we'll find paradise in the sky
When we die

 

Book Mark

Favorite Tracks: Just Sayin’, Under Control, Girl, For the World, Go With It, Get Away, Gabby

 

#soletitbewritten

Fonuts!

Fonuts!

Keen on Kiwi

Keen on Kiwi

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